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Indexing more like Alfred?

Posted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:02 pm
by Rorschach
Guys.

Why dont we have indexing like spotlight or alfred our of the box? I always need to add some folders to indexing rule. It is really annoying. Or maybe i do this in wrong way. I dont know. Please help me :)

Re: Indexing more like Alfred?

Posted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 2:54 pm
by JimmyTheSaint
Actually, I don't like Alfred's default, which includes folders in Home. I turn that off and then manually add the subfolders of Home that I want indexed, excluding the ones I don't want indexed.

Re: Indexing more like Alfred?

Posted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 12:34 pm
by Rorschach
Understand. But from my perspective i prefer alfred search engine. For example on Launchbar i can't find my documents from dropbox (location: ~/Dropbox/... ).

So it is pretty annoying to add another things when it occurs that i cannot find some file :(

Re: Indexing more like Alfred?

Posted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:11 pm
by lycopodiopsida
Well, the disadvantage in LB is that you have to configure your Index. The advantage is that you get a spot-on Index, unlike the mess Spotlight produces. Consider my git folders as an example - I am adding them with one level below, so I can get all the project folders with a search in LB. What I don't want to get are all those thousands of same-named files in the project folders, cluttering my search results.

Such things are impossible to granulate in Spotlight and this is why I consider the LB approach superior to Alfred. But you have to think about what makes sense in your search first. Since we already have one Alfred, I would prefer LB to stay that way. Tools which are tailored for power-users are rare these days.

Re: Indexing more like Alfred?

Posted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:39 pm
by JimmyTheSaint
The Alfred devs insist that using Spotlight offers significant CPU savings over LB's method. I wouldn't guess how much the user can perceive the impact on battery life, though. As for finding too many unwanted results, I do find that Alfred is very good at zeroing in on the things you really want. Of course, that's still going to depend on how your data is structured. Alfred's dealbreaker for me is the slow user interface: it takes a lot more keystrokes to accomplish my common tasks than LB.